Liss Llewellyn Fine Art - 20th Century British Art

Rudolph Sauter (18951977)   BIOGRAPHY

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Doodlebug Alley Death on the Way, 1944
Framed (ref: 7905)
Signed and dated, Press & Censorship Bureau approval inkstamp to verso
Watercolour over pencil on paper
10 x 13 in. (25 x 35 cm)

 


Exhibited: WW2 - War Pictures by British Artists, Morley College London, 28 October -23 November 2016, cat 55. 

Literature: WW2 - War Pictures by British Artists, Edited by Sacha Llewellyn & Paul Liss, July 2016, cat 55, page 93.

During World War II, Rudolf Sauter was an Army Welfare Officer under South Eastern Command. Although he was never an official war artist the events he witnessed informed his work. 

Sauter produced imaginative compositions with prophetic titles inspired by events he had observed; but he was disinterested in attempting to portray a faithful account. With some considerable liberty here Sauter shows V-1 Flying Bombs under attack from anti-aircraft artillery, indicated by the shell bursts lower right, and/or North American P-51 Mustangs. Flying Bombs were extremely fast and very small so had to be hit directly from behind which made the danger of flying into the debris cloud unavoidable.



Rudolph Sauter (18951977)

Painter, printmaker, illustrator and poet. Father was Georg Sauter, an artist from Bavaria. During WW1 Rudolph was interned at Alexandra Palace, (from 1918-19), on account of the fact that his father Georg (who had already been interned in Prison in Wakefield in 1919) was German by birth. His mother was Lilian Galsworthy, daughter of John Galsworthy, the novelist and creator of The Forsyte Saga. Rudolph developed strong literary interests and illustrated John Galsworthy's works. He painted a portrait of Galsworthy in 1927. He exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours and the Pastel Society. When his work was shown at the Salon in Paris, he was awarded an Honourable Mention. His work was shown widely in the provinces and in America. He had one-man shows in London and New York.

His work is held by the National Portrait Gallery, the RWA and the Ferens Art Gallery in Hull. Much of his work was destroyed by a fire in the 1980s. There is a significant collection in private hands in South Africa. Although mostly a figurative painter, late in life he did a series of pastel abstracts. He celebrated his eightieth birthday with a glider flight. He lived at FORT WILLIAM, Butterow, near Stroud, Gloucestershire.

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